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Fraser’s Impossible Dream for Wellington

Now in its seventh year, Impossible Dreams 2018 recently took place and Fraser Callaway, Managing Partner of Strategy Creative Wellington, was one of the disruptors and dreamers invited to speak at the forum. Fraser joined an impressive list of speakers including Hon Grant Robertson, Fairfax Media CEO Sinead Boucher, nanotechnologist Dr Michelle Dickinson, former Mayor and MP Georgina Beyer, Engineering NZ CEO Susan Freeman-Greene and prison reformer Kim Workman to name drop a few.

Fraser spoke about his (hopefully not-so-impossible) dream that the power of design can positively shape the future of Wellington, and the world. The talk challenged Oxford’s definition of ‘design’ and looked to redefine common perception. Fraser claimed the industry, and its potential, is being sold short as unfortunately most people's understanding of design is tied to aesthetic alone. With this in mind Fraser coined a new definition of design - 'A process to creatively solve problems and improve the status quo' and showcased case studies that exemplified what’s possible.

“My dream is that we redefine design. We change perceptions and elevate its importance in society. My dream is that we all embrace our creativity and problem solving skills. My dream is that we unleash design to do what science has done for the last 100 years but for the next 100”

Channeling his inner Martin Luther King Jr. and repetition Fraser lay down the gauntlet and talked about how realising this dream wasn’t just on designers. “As humans beings we are all innately creative problem solvers (it’s how we’ve survived) more so as Kiwi’s we have number 8 wire ingenuity in our DNA”. We’re all capable of participating in and trusting the design process to push the world forwards.

Part of trusting in the process is focussing on outcomes, not outputs. No doubt this is something you would have heard before if you’ve ever been a room with Fraser. At Strategy Creative we work with all of our clients to focus on what goals they want to achieve, what problems we can solve and what potential they want to realise, instead of what output they want to produce.

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